IS ‘FOOD WASTE’ REALLY A WASTE?

https://basis.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk466/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/cotton-cart-1024x707_0111.jpg?itok=wzZWrZgPMoms and dads were always imploring us not to leave the table without finishing everything on our plate.  That wasn’t a bad maxim at a time when we hadn’t supersized meals. As food has become cheaper as a part of our required expenses, does that admonition still mean anything?  Restaurants often think bigger is better, as meals have become cheaper, and heap on portions that are meant for a Philadelphia Eagles lineman.  In this context, two years ago, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the ‘first ever national food waste reduction goal, calling for a 50 percent reduction by 2030’.  First, perhaps, we should define what food waste is(not as easy as you might imagine) and realistically what the uses are for this recovered food. Hint: it will not get to starving people halfway around the world.  Professor Marc Bellemare provides a realistic assessment of the issue. He directs the Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy at the University of Minnesota.

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